Mt. Victory Camp Hiking

Ever gotten lost in the rain forest, on purpose?

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Many different species of plants and animals call St. Croix home, thanks to the diverse landscape of the island. As you make your way around the island, you are likely to see mongoose crossing the roads, iguanas sunning near the beach, Senepol cattle grazing alongside the road, and a vast array of birds fishing along the shore or diving into the water. In the waters of Caribbean Sea itself is a whole different ecosystem complete with an unimaginable amount of tropical fish, turtles, other animals, corals and vast amounts of plant life. And don’t forget the rainforest with it’s lush trees and dense foliage. Learn about the native plants and animals of St. Croix by visiting the botanical gardens and/or local farms, or by reading the information provided here on our website!

St. Croix ‘Animal Jam’ to Raise Funds for Animal Welfare

St. Croix ‘Animal Jam’ to Raise Funds for Animal Welfare

One of my favorite things about St. Croix from day one has been the way that most people here truly treat their pets like a member of the family (as they should).  » read more » 

The Sunshine Foundation

The Sunshine Foundation

Sunshine Foundation is dedicated to ending pet overpopulation on St Croix by providing basic, high-volume/low-cost spay and neuter services to people and pets in need. Sunshine Foundation is a 501C3 non-profit organization that opened the doors to » read more » 

Sunshine Foundation helps feral cats on St. Croix!

Sunshine Foundation helps feral cats on St. Croix!

If you have been on St. Croix for any amount of time you have probably noticed the abundance of feral cats in the residential neighborhoods, hanging around local restaurants and hotels, and » read more » 

The Miracle of Coconut

My husband, away for two weeks, has left me with 7 coconuts waiting to be cut open with our newly sharpened machete. It is a sight that fills me with pride and » read more » 

Guess who’s coming to dinner?

Guess who’s coming to dinner?

Humpback whales!The other night I was having dinner at eat@canebay with my family when I noticed some of the staff and customers were standing up and intently peering out over the water. » read more » 

Moving a Pet to St. Croix

Moving a Pet to St. Croix

A General Step-by-Step Guide As many of you can imagine, it’s impossible to move to paradise without bringing your pet along. I mean, just look at that cute little face…how can you » read more » 

Trees- Turpentine Tree

Turpentine TreeThis tree can grow to 40 feet or more living wildly in deciduous woods, or as a cultivated ornamental. It is native to the West Indies, Central America, and South Florida » read more » 

Trees- Sandbox

SandboxNobody, including monkeys, would attempt to climb this tree. In fact, locally, it is better known as the Monkey-No-Climb. Its yellow-gray bark is covered with short, squat, fleshy spines. When we say » read more » 

Trees- Seaside Mahoe

Seaside MahoeThe seaside Mahoe looks very much like the Manchineel. A good way to tell them apart is by the leaves. The seaside Mahoe has green, heart-shaped, 4- to 5-inch leaves with » read more » 

Trees- Manchineel

ManchineelUsually found near the beach, offering wonderful shade and golden apples, the Manchineel tree is very dangerous! Columbus recorded the first record of its poisonous nature, after his men had died after » read more » 

Trees- Powder Puff

Powder Puff Tree (Calliandra inaequilatera)This majestic tree, native to the West Indies, can grow to more than 75 feet. Leaves are found in 3 to 10 pairs of shiny, stiff, glossy leaflets, » read more » 

Trees- Mahogany

MahoganyThis majestic tree, native to the West Indies, can grow to more than 75 feet. Leaves are found in 3 to 10 pairs of shiny, stiff, glossy leaflets, each about 6 inches » read more » 

Trees- African Tulip Tree

African Tulip TreeThe major attraction of this Kenya native are its large softball-sized bell-shaped orange-red flowers with a yellow border on the petals…huge and spectacular. There are also referred to as Fire » read more » 

Fruit- Tamarind

Tamarind (Tamarindus indica)The leaves of the Tamarind tree are alternate and plentiful, giving it a light green feathery look. They are each 1 inch long with parallel edges. Lumpy green, then brown » read more » 

Fruit- Soursop

Soursop (Annona muricata)By the looks of this fruit, you may not want anything to do with it, but it is actually quite tasty! The inner white flesh is a sweet pulp that » read more » 

Fruit- Sea Grape

Sea Grape (Coccoloba uvifera)Found by the sea and safe to use for shade, the sea grape can also be eaten when ripe. The leaves look like fans and can be used as » read more » 

Fruit- Papaya

PapayaA papaya tree can be spotted by its soft, greenish and hollow trunk topped with many spiraled, umbrella-like clusters of large leaves bearing pear shaped fruit. In the wild, papaya trees are » read more » 

Fruit- Mango

Mango (Mangifera indica)Though there are several types of mangoes, each one is sweet, juicy, and refreshing. The leaves are simple, alternate, and clustered at branch tips. They are narrow, pointed, glossy, short-stalked » read more » 

Fruit- Kenip

KenipThe Kenip tree is large with a usually straight trunk with many branches bearing many oval shaped leaves. It’s fragrant flowers grow in clusters at branch ends. The male and female flowers » read more » 

Fruit- Carambola

Carambola (Averrhoa carambola)More commonly reffered to as a Star Fruit (yes, really!) these juicy golden drops of sunshine can be found growing on trees several months out of the year. The entire » read more » 

Fruit- Breadfruit

Breadfruit (Artocarpus communis)The beautifully lobed leaves and impressive green fruits of the breadfruit are easily recognizable in the Caribbean, and their quiet cultivation belies the tumultuous history of its origin in these » read more » 

Fruit- Banana

Banana (Musa spp)Originally from Southeast Asia, now grown in over 107 countries throughout the tropics. Though most people are familiar with the popular store variety, the Cavendish, few realize the variety that » read more » 

Fruit- Avocado

Avocado (Persea americana)Also called “Pears” in the Caribbean, the mild-flavored avocado has a saucy nomenclature. Derived from the Nahuatl people (traditionally referred to as “Aztecan”) of Central Mexico, their word for avocado, » read more » 

Plants- Tan-Tan

Tan-TanThis prolific plant can be found almost everywhere on the island… on roadsides, open fields, woodlands, even inside houses growing like a weed beside your favorite house plant. It grows fast and » read more » 

Plants- Century Plant

Century Plant (Agave americana)The century plant resembles an Aloe plant, except it is much larger and possesses sharper spines on the leaves’ edges and its pointed tip is sharp and strong. Until » read more » 

Plants- Casha Bush

Casha BushThis very intimidating thorn-covered bush is seen almost everywhere on the island. Its leaves are numerous, each about ¨ ∫ inch long and blunt tipped. Casha also holds cylindrical tiny yellow » read more » 

Plants- Cactus

Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)Many different types of cacti are present throughout St.Croix, mostly on the dry terrain of the East End. The “prickly pear” (a) can be found throughout the island. Many use » read more » 

Plants- Aloe

Aloe (Aloe vera)Originating on the Mediterranean coast of Africa, Aloe thrives in climates such as the Caribbean as well as Central and South America. It has large, fleshy, strap-like leaves close to » read more » 

Fauna- Sphinx Moth Caterpillars

Sphinx Moth CaterpillarsAn full grown larvae can grow up to 10 inches long! Amazingly, when they develop into their adult stage of a moth, they are small and brownish in color. I » read more » 

Fauna- Senepol Cattle

Senepol CattleThis beautiful species of cattle is native to St. Croix. The feed on the lush green hills on the west end of the island. You can read the history of how » read more » 

Fauna- No See Ums

No-See-UmsThis is the official, technical term for little nat-like bugs that you can’t see, but you can certainly feel! They itch like the devil and like damp, moist, low-lying outside areas. You » read more » 

Fauna- Mosquitoes

MosquitoesUggh, it is the harsh reality. We have the little blood sucking boogers. Mosquitoes are usually prevalent after big rains, and feed at dawn and dusk. But don’t fret; come prepared! Bring » read more » 

Fauna- Mongoose

MongooseOh, our curious little mascot! You’ll catch these quick little rodents scurrying across the road, or even taunting an iguana. Mongoose were brought to the island to eradicate the rat problem. Well, » read more » 

Fauna- Iguanas

IguanasLook in trees, mangroves and scurrying across the road for this pre-historic looking reptile. Iguanas are native to the Caribbean where they like the sun and warm waters just as much as » read more » 

Fauna- Hermit Crabs

Hermit CrabsFirst thing’s first: do not take these cute crustaceans home to keep as a pet. They live here for a reason. When the animal that lives inside the hard shell grows, » read more » 

Fauna- Gecko

Gecko, AnoleCommonly referred to as a House Gecko; they are EVERYWHERE on St. Croix! Geckos are cute, fun to watch and totally harmless. In fact, people allow them to stay in their » read more » 

Fauna- Donkeys

DonkeysDonkeys were brought here by colonists from under every flag. They are traditionally work animals. On St. John, you might be awakened in the middle of the night by the breigh of » read more » 

Fauna- Deer

DeerYep, deer on the island. They were brought here in the 1700′s for sport. No hunting is allowed of these gentle animals. They exist from the east to the west ends of » read more » 

Fauna- Chickens

ChickensA.K.A. Yard Birds. These cluckers are pretty much feral and run amuck all over the island. You’ll see them in town, hens with chicks, roosters crowing. Some locals do care and feed » read more » 

Fauna- Bats

BatsRight at dusk, you can catch glimpses of these fast-flying mammals. They fly out from under roof eaves, caves, and even abandoned structures to feed on insects; which really helps keeps the » read more » 

Flora- Plumbago

Plumbago ( Plumbago capensis )Also called Leadwort because of its lead colored roots. Plumbago can be found growing wildly along the roadside or in planters around the island as decoration.In clusters among » read more » 

Flora- Hibiscus

Hibiscus ( Hibiscus spp )Because of its great beauty and hardiness, the Hibiscus has become a well-known and well-loved plant. It may be the official flower of Hawaii, but the Hibiscus can » read more » 

Flora- Ginger Thomas

Ginger Thomas (The USVI Official Flower)Native to tropical and subtropical America, Texas, New Mexico and Florida, this beautiful yellow flower can be found thriving year round on St. Croix from hillsides and » read more » 

Flora- Frangipani

Frangipani ( Plumeria rubra, Plumeria acutfolia )These beautiful flowers are most commonly seen as white with a diffused yellow center, or bright pink with a yellow to orange center. The flowers grow » read more » 

Flora- Cup of Gold

Cup of Gold (Solandra nitida)Cup Of Gold is a beautiful bright yellow flowing plant that can grow up to 40 feet tall! This vine can be extremely invasive if not kept in » read more » 

Flora- Crown of Thorns

Crown-of-Thorns (Euphorbia splendens)This tropical plant came all the way from Madascar. Its blooms are mostly red and its thick stems are covered in thorns. Cuttings from this plant can be stuck directly » read more » 

Flora- Bouganvillea

Bougainvillea ( Bougainvillea spp )With many varieties and colors, it is no wonder that this bush is seen so often. Colors range from a dark red to a subtle white. Leaves are » read more » 

Flora- Bird of Paradise

Bird of Paradise Flower( Strelitzia )Do you see the resemblence? This flower is actually native to South Africa, where it is also known as the crane flower. The species was brought here » read more » 

Lionfish: Caribbean Reef Killers at Large

Lionfish: Caribbean Reef Killers at Large

Many of you may have already heard about the threat that is facing our precious coral reefs‚ the lionfish. If you haven’t, it’s time to learn about this invasive species, and spread » read more » 

Senepol Cattle – The Crucian Breed

Senepol Cattle – The Crucian Breed

It all started a long time ago in 1860 when a man named George Elliott decided to import 60 Senegalese (N’Dama) heifers and two bulls from Senegal West Africa. Mr. Henry Nelthropp, » read more » 

Hawksbill Turtle Watch

Every species on the earth has its specific place and particular role in the ecosystem. Marine turtles are no different. They are a small part of ocean species that need to be » read more » 

Crab Races are Fun for the Whole Family!

Crab Races are Fun for the Whole Family!

A bucket, some chalk, some great prizes, and a few dozen hermit crabs…that’s right, HERMIT CRABS. Sound interesting? Then catch one of St. Croix’s weekly crab races put on by island residents » read more » 

A Trip to the St. Croix Avian Sanctuary with Toni Lance

A Trip to the St. Croix Avian Sanctuary with Toni Lance

There’s a good chance, if you live on St. Croix that you’ve heard of Toni Lance, St. Croix’s “Bird Lady,” as she has been dubbed. A lifelong bird and animal lover, Toni » read more » 

Leave Paradise in its Place

Leave Paradise in its Place

KEEP THE VIRGIN ISLANDS BEAUTIFUL! Residents and visitors appreciate the Virgin Islands for a number of reasons, but the gorgeous beaches and stunning underwater ecosystems definitely rank at the top of our list » read more » 

Fizzy Fermenting Fever

VISFI (aka Creque Dam Farm/Ridge to Reef), Top 10 finisher in the National Geographic Society’s Geotourism Challenge, hosted a Fizzy February workshop by special guest Sandor Katz, a fermentation fiend and author » read more » 

Respect the Turtles

Respect the Turtles

My family and I had a rare opportunity to observe the emergence of turtle hatchlings, and not just any turtles, but endangered Leather-backs. (I could not wait to take photos of the » read more »